The California / State Theatre

787 Market St. | map |


Opened: November 1, 1917 as the California Theatre. It was on the southeast corner of 4th and Market. Previously on the site was a building housing the Pastime Theatre. In the photo the theatre is playing "By Right of Purchase" with Norma Talmadge, a film that opened at the theatre on Sunday, March 24, 1918. Note that second entrance on 4th St. Thanks to Bennett Hall for the photo on Flickr.

Architect: Alfred Henry Jacobs

Seating: 2,780 originally. 2,133 in its later years.

The theatre was a venture of the Market Street Realty Co. and operated by Eugene H. Roth's Popular Amusement Co., who also had the nearby Portola Theatre. Soon the California was being operated by Wobber Brothers and managed by Jack Partington, who had worked for the Graumans at the Imperial. A February 13, 1926 article in Exhibitors Herald about Partington noted:

"After the Graumans sold the Imperial to Wobber Brothers and it was merged with the California theatre, Partington was placed in charge of both houses. When the Rothschild [sic] interests took over the two houses and built the Granada, Partington was given charge of the three theatres. This position he held until his transfer to Los Angeles [in 1926]." Thanks to Bob Foreman for finding the article on Internet Archive. 

A big success initially, the California ran into hard times as the theatre district continued to move farther west on Market St. It was renamed the State Theatre with a reopening December 31, 1941.

Closing: It closed as a film house March 2, 1954. ABC-Paramount was the last operator. It was then occasionally rented out for revival meetings and other events.

Status: The theatre was demolished in 1961 and 1962. After being a parking lot for a few years a building for the clothing store Roos-Atkins rose on the site. It's now occupied by a Ross Dress For Less.

The California Theatre in the Movies: About 45 seconds into "Fog Over Frisco" (Warner Bros., 1934) there are a couple brief shots of Market and 4th, showing the California Theatre. The film stars Bette Davis and Donald Woods. Thanks to Jack Tillmany for the data.


 A story about the theatre's steel work that appeared in the March 10, 1917 issue of Engineering Record. Thanks to Bob Ristelhueber for finding the article. 
 


A pre-opening ad in the collection of the California State Library



It's our personal invitation to the opening. Thanks to Bob Ristelhueber for the finding this for a post on the BAHT Facebook page.


The new theatre was profiled in a 2+ page article in the December 22, 1917 issue of Moving Picture World that's on Internet Archive:





"Coast Theatre Mechanically Perfect." The article below detailed the theatre's electrical and mechanical systems and appeared in the April 20, 1918 issue of the trade magazine Motography. 


Thanks to Bob Ristelhueber for finding the Motography article for a post on the BAHT Facebook page



We get a look at a set on stage for a concert in this story in the December 18, 1920 issue of Exhibitors Herald.



This cover for the program at the Imperial, California and Granada was for the week of October 28, 1922. At the time, the three theatres were under the management of Herbert Rothchild with Paramount also in there with an ownership stake. The program is on Calisphere from the Museum of Performance and Design Performing Arts Library. 



A program for a "Discovery Concert" in February 1923. Thanks to Glenn Koch for sharing the item from a scrapbook he has in his collection.


Photos of the ticket lobby:


One of three photos of the theatre appearing in the August 1918 issue of The Architect. Note the elaborate frieze above the entrance doors. The issue is on Internet Archive.



"Dominant Motif of Central Panel of Frieze in the Main Entrance Lobby..." The photo appeared in a "Portfolio of Photographs of the Frieze in the Main Entrance Lobby of the California Theatre" in the November 1917 issue of Architect and Engineer. It's on Internet Archive. The paintings were done by Ray F. Coyle.



"Portion of Central Panel of Frieze in Main Entrance Lobby..." Photo: Architect and Engineer - November 1917



"Central Motif Left Hand Panel in Main Entrance Lobby..." And by that they mean the ticket lobby outside. Photo: Architect and Engineer - November 1917


Lobby and lounge areas:


A fountain in the main lobby. Note the exit doors in the mirror. The November 1917 photo is from the Jack Tillmany collection. He comments: "Cupid Amongst the Ferns. I'm sure it's just an unfortunately placed fern frond, but it almost looks like Cupid is a little TOO enthusiastically anatomically correct."



A balcony level lobby view. It's a photo from the August 1918 issue of The Architect

Gary Parks comments: "I have it on good authority from a late Fox West Coast exec that I used to know, that when this theatre was the (Fox-run) State, it hosted overnight sleeping by soldiers and sailors during WWII, and that the somewhat labyrinthine Mezzanine and balcony passages and lounges became an ideal place for some of the usherettes to make some extra money attending to the needs of some of the boys in uniform--needs which I leave to the imagination. Let's keep in mind that this was no longer the top tier movie house it had originally been, by that time."



A 1917 lounge room photo from the Jack Tillmany collection on the San Francisco Public Library website. A version of the photo appeared with an article profiling the new theatre in the December 22, 1917 issue of Moving Picture World. It's on Internet Archive. Thanks to Bob Ristelhueber for finding the article for a post on the BAHT Facebook page.



A detail of the fountain seen at the far end of the room in the previous photo. The photo from the Jack Tillmany collection appears on the San Francisco Public Library website.



A view of the ladies lounge. It's a photo from the Jack Tillmany collection. He calls our attention to the intercom on the wall near the door.



The painting above the fireplace. The photo comes from the November 1917 issue of Architect and Engineer where they captioned it "Over Mantel For Ladies' Dressing Room..." 


The auditorium: 


A balcony view from the August 1918 issue of The Architect. It's on Internet Archive. There's also a version of the photo from the Jack Tillmany collection on the Cinema Tour page about the California. The San Francisco Public Library also has a version. 



A shot from the back of the balcony that gives us a look at the chandeliers and the Gothic ceiling treatment. The photo appeared in the December 22, 1917 issue of Moving Picture World. It's on Internet Archive. The San Francisco Public Library has a version of the photo from the Jack Tillmany collection. 



A 1920s look toward the screen from the Jack Tillmany collection. He comments: "The size of  the screen was determined by the maximum amount of area that could be properly lit. Of course, in later years, the screen was larger, but never went wide, as the theatre closed before wide screen projection got a real foothold in 1953-1954."



A 1920s view toward the rear of the house. Note the main floor booth. It's a photo from the Jack Tillmany collection. 



In the booth with the Motiograph projectors in 1917. Thanks to Jack Tillmany for the photo.


More exterior views:


A 1917 postcard view shot during a parade caught the California Theatre on the right while still under construction. Thanks to Glenn Koch for spotting the card on eBay. That's the Portola Theatre to the left.



A 4th & Market pre-opening photo appearing with an article profiling the new theatre in the December 22, 1917 issue of Moving Picture World. Note the unfinished marquees. It's on Internet Archive. Thanks to Bob Ristelhueber for finding the article for a post of six photos on the BAHT Facebook page.



A mid-November 1917 photo from the Jack Tillmany collection. The new theatre is running "Arms and the Girl" with Billie Burke. Jack calls our attention to the fact that here the storefronts are still vacant.



A January 4, 1918 look at the new theatre. Thanks to Bob Ristelhueber for finding the photo in the SFMTA Archives for a post on the Facebook page San Francisco Remembered.



A look east on Market at 4th during the last week of May 1918. Beyond the California Theatre on the corner (running something with William S. Hart) we get a glimpse of the Portola Theatre as well. The photo, from the Emiliano Echeverria / Randolph Brandt Collection, appears on the Open SF History Project website. 

 A version of this shot is in the San Francisco Public Library collection. The photo also appears with a November 2016 SF Gate story "Rare, unseen photos from the Chronicle's morgue...."



A photo taken the last week of August 1918 from the Jack Tillmany collection. A smaller version appears on the San Francisco Public Library website.



The 4th St. marquee in August 1918. Thanks to Jack Tillmany for the photo.



An early corner view, part of a lovely set Wayne Miller found at a flea market. The set is on the Facebook page San Francisco Remembered.



A photo with Charles Ray in "Paris Green" on the marquee. It played the last week of May 1920. Thanks to Martin Treu for the photo on his Signs, Streets and Storefronts Facebook page. He comments that the design "demonstrated how well a theatre's graphic identity could be seamlessly integrated with the architecture. Here, the architect carried the lines of the facade up to an extended parapet which incorporates lettering carefully with the Gothic style tracery. Bravo!"



A June 11, 1922 photo from Jack Tillmany. He comments: "A little promotion: 'The Gray Dawn' was a Gold Rush tale set in Old San Francisco, apparently involving a newspaper called The Bulletin, no relation to the SF rag of the same name, but obviously a good idea for a promo stunt."



A June 1923 view of the 4th St. marquee. Thanks to Jack Tillmany for finding the photo. 



A December 1923 photo from the Jack Tillmany collection. He comments: "The usual street work on Market St. Note: The Portola marquee has vanished!"  



An October 1924 photo from Jack Tillmany. Note the added readerboard this side of the California's entrance. The big marquee down the block at the left of the photo belonged to the Odeon Theatre. By the time of this photo the space had been repurposed as the Metropolitan Market.



A press photo dated August 13, 1925. The feature is "Not So Long Ago" with Betty Bronson and Ricards Cortez. Thanks to Christopher Snowdon for the photo, a post on the BAHT Facebook page.



The theatre got its picture in the August 28, 1926 issue of Motion Picture News. It's noting the promotion of a short, "The Bear Cats," on their signage -- which they've helpfully circled for us. Thanks to Bob Ristelhueber for finding the photo for a post on the BAHT Facebook page.



A June 1927 photo in the San Francisco Public Library collection.



A September 1927 photo with the California running "The Big Parade" with John Gilbert and Renée Adorée. (Don't you love that name?) It's a photo from the Jack Tillmany collection. 

Jack comments: "'The Big Parade' returns at popular prices as the California's offering for Greater Movie Season. It had opened in January 1926, on a reserved seat, roadshow policy, at the Wilkes: 'Every chair reserved! Thousands turned away DAILY.' Did I say the Wilkes? Yes! From January 1925 - June 1927, the Geary, nee Columbia, operated as the Wilkes, before becoming the Lurie, until February 1928, when it once again became the Geary."



Thanks to Andra Young on San Francisco Remembered for this hand-colored look east on Market.  Jack Tillmany comments that the card is based on a photo taken no later than 1930.



The front dressed up for the January 1930 run of "Sally." Note the sign at the top of the image advertising Marilyn Miller, the star of the film.



Another view of the promotion for "Sally." That's the boxoffice on the right. Thanks to Jack Tillmany for finding the photos.



The signage for "Puttin' on the Ritz" in March 1930. The photo is from the Jack Tillmany collection.



A November 1931 calendar from the Jack Tillmany collection. He comments: "Depression Woes! 3 changes per week, double features on every program!"



A January 1, 1932 photo from the Jack Tillmany collection. That Gray Line bus station to the left of the Bank of America Building was the Portola Theatre. It had closed as a theatre in 1928 and was reopened in 1944.



The 1934 general strike was the occasion for this photo of the 4th St. marquee from International News Service. Thanks to Glenn Koch for spotting it on eBay. It was sent out with this caption:

"Theatre Closed in Frisco Because of Strike -- As the sign on the marquee indicates, this theatre in San Francisco, like so many others throughout the city, was forced to shut down when the general strike, now gripping the city, was called yesterday morning, July 16th. 200,000 persons went out on strike in sympathy with the 4,000 dock workers whose strike started in May."



A January 1937 calendar from the Jack Tillmany collection. He notes: " Still pretty depressed and even more depressing! 2/3 changes per week! Bargain Matinees 20 cents; Evenings (all seats) 30 cents (no extra charge for loges). YIKES! Bank Night every Thursday; Ten-O-Win every Monday!"



A 1939 slide from the Jack Tillmany collection. He comments: "It's the only color image I've seen of it during its California years. Of course, this one's interesting too because it's such a perfect example of the four tracks of streetcars that once ran up Market Street, affectionately known among rail fans as The Roar of the Four. The Muni cars (Gray, trimmed with red, lines identified by letter) ran on the outside tracks & the Market Street Railway cars, (Green, with white fronts, lines identified by number), ran on the inside tracks. 

"Boarding cars on the inside tracks might seem perilous today (the clearance was no more than 22 inches) but was just a common day to day ordeal to the intrepid souls of yesteryear. The outside tracks were removed in 1948 as rubber began to replace rail after WWII. Don't look for the Portola Theatre. From 1928 to 1944 it served as the Gray Line Bus Depot. You can identify their signage out over the sidewalk in front of the site, red background, blue quadrangle." Thanks to Matt Spero for color correction work.



No, we're not on Market St. -- on the left we get the theatre's second marquee on the 4th St. side of the building as we look south from Market. The photo appears on the Open SF History Project website courtesy of a private collector.



A November 1940 photo from the Jack Tillmany collection. He comments: "The California by now is definitely upgraded from its 1930s woes, but still a secondary venue. 'Wyoming' opened at the Fox in September 1940, and 'Argentine Nights' opened at the Orpheum in September 1940. By November they were paired at the State, much like they would have been at the Embassy, but without the advantage of Ten-O-Win, the Embassy would have held the winning hand.

We know the California offered both Ten-O-Win on Monday and Bank Night on Thursday in 1937, but the question is, were they still doing so in 1940? Note the Gray Line marquee on the old Portola site. For rail fans who might be interested, Market Street Railway's Line #20 provided service to the Southern Pacific Depot to passengers from the Oak Street/Page Street corridor by way of Divisadero and the O'Farrell Street/Ellis Street corridor. Service was abandoned in 1947."



A 1942 look east by Meith Hagel for Life. The State, over on the right, is running "In This Our Life," a May release with Bette Davis along with Hitchcock's "Saboteur," an April release. This photo, and other 40s views that Mr. Hagel took in San Francisco, are on the site Vintage Everyday. Thanks to Ernie Manzo Jr. for spotting the collection. 



A late 1942 or early 1943 photo from the Jack Tillmany collection. He comments: "The State has a sub-run of 2 top of the line features; note the banner, provided, along with posters and trailers, by National Screen Service. They were stitched together in the middle, so whatever combination of titles the theatre chose could be sewn together as a single banner. The Portola site is still in operation as the Gray Line Depot."



A view from the last week of March 1943. Thanks to Jack Tillmany for the screenshot from "San Francisco Yesterday - Today - Tomorrow," a 1943 promotional short urging voters to OK buying out the Market Street Railway and merging it with Muni. Jack notes: "The film is 'Stand By for Action,' which had opened at the Fox in January. To co-feature is a retread of the popular 1942 comedy, 'I Married a Witch."



An April 1943 look west from the Jack Tillmany collection. The Gray Line is still running their operation at the Portola.



A May 1943 photo by Ann Rosener looking down Ellis St. to 4th & Market. Thanks to Phil Davies for the post on the Facebook page San Francisco Remembered. The photo also appears in Bennett Hall's collection on Flickr. The theatre had been renamed the State in 1941 -- note that the California letters are off the roof sign and that we no longer have a vertical.



A January 1944 photo from Jack Tillmany. He notes: "'Old Acquaintance' had opened at the Paramount in December 1943 and played three weeks so successfully, it moved over to the State for a 4th week continuing its Market Street first run, typical of that era. The Gray Line seems to have vanished from the Portola site, probably as the result of WWII gasoline rationing impacting its operation."



"Song of Bernadette" at the State in August 1944 after winning four Academy Awards. Note that the theatre is still using milk glass letters. It's a Tom Gray photo from the Jack Tillmany collection. The ticket stubs are also from Jack's collection. A smaller version of the photo appears on the San Francisco Public Library website.



An August 14, 1945 VJ Day photo at 3rd & Market. Note the new readerboard faces. That's the Portola theatre just beyond the State's marquee. The photo appears on a page of VJ Day photos on the website of the Lynchberg, VA News & Advance.



A Time/Life photo taken on VJ Day 1945. Thanks to Bob Ristelhueber for posting it on the BAHT Facebook page.



What a busy street. It's Christmas shopping time in 1945 as we look east across 4th St. toward the State, playing "Fallen Angel," a December 1945 release with Alice Faye. Thanks to Lily Costello for the photo on San Francisco Remembered.



A July 1946 Shriners parade photo from the Jack Tillmany collection.



A February 26, 1947 look east on Market from 4th with "Nora Prentiss" with Ann Sheridan at the State and Jane Russell in "The Outlaw" at the Portola. It's a newspaper photo from the San Francisco Public Library. They don't say what paper it was in, but here's the caption printed with the photo:

"MARKET ST. MORNING SCENE -- No, sir, this is not a picture of a big streetcar tie-up, but just a regular morning scene downtown. With track repair work in progress on lower Market St. Municipal Railway officials explained, there is a 9 a. m. 'switchback,' when the inner tracks below First St which are being replaced are taken out of service until the evening rush hour. This will be going on every day for several months -- and the Muni managers wish people would stop calling up and demanding, 'What's the big tie-up all about?'"



A July 1947 view as we look east on Market St.  Playing this week: "Shanghai Gesture" (a January 1942 release) and "Jack London" (released in December 1943). Down a couple of doors the theatre we see with the "Port.." banner is the Portola. The photo is from Jack Tillmany and appears on the Cinema Tour page for the theatre.



An October 1947 photo from Jack Tillmany's collection featuring a streetcar decked out to promote the annual Community Chest drive. He comments: "Interesting for a couple of reasons: 'Driftwood' was a Republic B+ trying to pass itself off as an A, which 'enjoyed' its SF Premiere at the State, but the savvy moviegoing public knew that if it was worthwhile, it would have opened at Paramount or St. Francis, and also recognized that 'All Star Cast' translated as 'nobody worth mentioning' and apparently stayed away in droves, because it was replaced the following week by a rerun of the eternal Frankenstein & Dracula combination.

"Meantime, we can see just enough of the Portola banner to read '1st Run.' Yeah, sure. I checked the Chronicle. They were offering two ten year old 1937 retreads with fresh titles: 'Wings Over Wyoming' (nee 'Hollywood Cowboy') with George O'Brien and 'Wings of Glory' (nee 'Love Takes Flight') with Bruce Cabot, both of them ten years old, and barely B+ at their best."



Thanks to Bill Gabel for this great postcard view. We're in the block between 4th and 5th -- our Gothic-themed theatre is down at the next corner. Bill has the card on the Cinema Treasures page for the theatre.



A June 3, 1948 photo from the Jack Tillmany collection. He comments: "A different banner at the Portola and a new paint job on the tower. It's already found its niche as Market Street's first exploitation outlet with 'Hitch Hike to Hell' and 'Forbidden Adventure,' two bottom of the barrel entities which failed to pass the Production Code and bypassed mainstream venues."



It's October 1, 1948 in this SFMTA photo. Thanks to Bob Ristelhueber for finding it in their archives for a post on the BAHT Facebook page.



A December 1948 photo from the Tom B'hend / Preston Kaufmann collection. Thanks to Jack Tillmany for sending it along. He notes that it's his favorite photo of the theatre. 



A lovely look west toward 4th St. and beyond. Playing at the State on July 4, 1949: Bob Hope in "Sorrowful Jones" with that 2nd big hit "Amazon Quest." Well, the banner says "Always 2 Big Hits.' That's a bit of the Portola Theatre marquee on the left. The photo, from the SFMTA Archives, appears on the Market St. section of the blog San Francisco Pictures.



A c.1950 view by John Gerrard Graham. It's in the San Francisco Public Library collection. Note a bit of the Portola Theatre in the background.



An October 1950 photo appearing on the Open SF History Project website courtesy of a private collector. It's the "Double Horror Show" for Halloween: "House of Frankenstein" and "House of Dracula." Thanks to Jack Tillmany for spotting the photo in the collection.



A detail from the October 1950 photo. That's a bit of the Portola Theatre on the far left.



A 1951 photo from the Ronald W. Mahan collection. Just beyond the State, the vertical of the Portola is seen, with the neon overlay on the sign saying "Theatre." Thanks, Ron!  Jack Tillmany notes that this double bill of "Cocaine" and "Frustration" played the State in mid-August and adds: 

"It's another chapter in our on-going saga of 'Why Theatres Closed?' Don't blame TV. 'Cocaine' was an Italian import, 'Frustration' was a Swedish import, both of them were at least two years old, but advertised as 'Two First Run Adult Hits.' Probably the State was trying to steal the Portola's audience. Competitively speaking, the Portola that week was running a triple bill of 'Sinful Souls,' 'Slaves in Bondage' and 'Nude Range,' all of them re-titled crud from the 1930s that never played mainstream venues." 


A detail from Ron's 1951 photo.



"She's Working Her Way Through College" with Virginia Mayo as a burlesque dancer going to school. The film was a July 1952 release. Thanks to Maria Icle Kava for posting the photo on the Facebook page San Francisco Remembered



Thanks to Bill Gabel for this fine March 1953 view looking east on Market from 4th. Jack Tillmany notes: "'The Star' with Bette Davis is playing at the St. Francis. The State was closed at that time. It briefly re-opened in December with 'Fighter Attack,' but would soon close permanently in March 1954." The image appears in the photo section of the Cinema Treasures page for the State Theatre.



A July 4, 1953 photo appearing on the Open SF History website courtesy of a private collector.



A December 23, 1953 newspaper view that appeared with the copy: "FACE-WASHING -- Getting all spruced up for its reopening Christmas Day as a first-run motion picture theater is the State, at Market and Fourth-sts. Its first film will be 'Fighter Attack,' a drama of wartime escape in Italy. Sterling Hayden stars." The photo is in the San Francisco Public Library collection. The face washing wasn't enough to save it. Jack Tillmany notes that the theatre was closed for a while, then re-opened, then closed permanently in March 1954.



An April 1956 photo from the Jack Tillmany collection. The show looks better down the block at the Portolá Theatre with "Hollywood Jungle" and "Models on Parade." The photo also makes an appearance on Wiki Commons on their "Cinemas in San Francisco" page.



A 1956 Fred Lyons photo from his book "San Francisco Then." It was on the San Francisco Remembered Facebook page as a post by Cesar Anguiano.



A 1957 double horror feature "The Body is a Shell" and "Life After Death." Oh, wait. It's copy on the marquee from the church using the theatre. Thanks to Maria Iclea Kava for finding the photo.




A look down toward the Ferry Building. Thanks to Gianni Corso for finding the photo. The marquee of the closed theatre is promoting a run of Spencer Tracy in "The Last Hurrah," a film that Jack Tillmany reports opened at the Paramount in November 1958.



A July 1959 photo by an unknown photographer. The marquee is advertising "The Nun's Story" playing at the St. Francis. Beyond, we get a peek at the marquee for the Portola / Farros / Paris Theatre. Thanks to Jack Tillmany for spotting the photo on the Open SF History Project website.



A March 1961 Chronicle photo by Ken McLaughlin. Thanks to Jack Tillmany for sharing this version from his collection. A cropped version appeared on the Chronicle Facebook page with this caption: "April 12, 1961: The State Theater on Market Street was a draw for S.F. residents and tourists during the 1960s." The April 12 business was evidently the publication date. On the left note a rare look at the Portola Theatre when it was named the Farros. It would soon become the Paris Theatre.

Jack Tillmany responded:  "I don't know who wrote this caption. It's stupid enough to qualify for the present low level of the SF Chronicle information. If one of these perps would simply read what's on the marquee: 'St. Francis Now PEPE' they might be able to figure out that 'Pepe' is not showing at the State; it's showing at the St. Francis, and the State is CLOSED. It ceased operating as a film venue in March 1954, which hardly qualifies it as a 'draw for S.F. residents and tourists during the 1960s.' The only times it opened up during that period of time were for religious revivals. Demolition took place in 1961 and 1962, which would been the only time during that decade it may have been called a 'draw for SF residents and tourists during the 1960s.'"



Another March 1961 look at the State and the Farros. Thanks to Jack Tillmany for spotting the photo by an unknown photographer on the Open SF History Project website. 



Thanks to Christopher Snowdon for this June 1961 look at the doomed theatre. On the marquee we're advertising the show at the St. Francis -- Gregory Peck in "The Guns of Navarone," a June release. Christopher posted this as a comment to several demo photos from Bob Ristelheuber on the BAHT Facebook page.



A slide taken by Jack Tillmany just before demolition. Thanks to Matt Spero for bringing it back to life.



Thanks to Christopher Snowden for this 1961 demolition photo, posted as a comment on the BAHT Facebook page.



Thanks to Jack Tillmany for this 1961 demo photo from his collection.



Looking in from the stage end of the building in 1961. We're on 4th, looking toward Market St. Thanks to Bob Ristelhueber for snapping a photo of this image that's in the San Francisco Public Library collection for a post on the BAHT Facebook page. The photo has not yet been added to the SFPL's digital collection. 



Looking down onto the steel with not much else left. It's a News Call-Bulletin photo in the San Francisco Public Library collection dated December 30, 1961. We're looking onto Market St. Note the arrow pointing to a guy on the steel in this news photo. Thanks to Bob Ristelhueber for finding the photo in the SFPL collection. 

More information: The theatre was featured in the August 1918 issue of The Architect. It's on Internet Archive. See the pages about the theatre on Cinema Tour and Cinema Treasures.

Jack Tillmany's Arcadia Publishing book "Theatres of San Francisco" can be previewed on Google Books. It's available from Amazon or your local bookseller.

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